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Data Sharing without Rewards in Multi-Task Offline Reinforcement Learning
Tianhe Yu · Aviral Kumar · Yevgen Chebotar · Chelsea Finn · Sergey Levine · Karol Hausman
Event URL: https://openreview.net/forum?id=c7SmcWAd74W »

Offline reinforcement learning (RL) bears the promise to learn effective control policies from static datasets but is thus far unable to learn from large databases of heterogeneous experience. The multi-task version of offline RL enables the possibility of learning a single policy that can tackle multiple tasks and allows the algorithm to share offline data across tasks. Recent works indicate that sharing data between tasks can be highly beneficial in multi-task learning. However, these benefits come at a cost -- for data to be shared between tasks, each transition must be annotated with reward labels corresponding to other tasks. This is particularly expensive and unscalable, since the manual effort in annotating reward grows quadratically with the number of tasks. Can we retain the benefits of data sharing without requiring reward relabeling for every task pair? In this paper, we show that, perhaps surprisingly, under a binary-reward assumption, simply utilizing data from other tasks with constant reward labels can not only provide a substantial improvement over only using the single-task data and previously proposed success classifiers, but it can also reach comparable performance to baselines that take advantage of the oracle multi-task reward information. We also show that this performance can be further improved by selectively deciding which transitions to share, again without introducing any additional models or classifiers. We discuss how these approaches relate to each other and baseline strategies under various assumptions on the dataset. Our empirical results show that it leads to improved performance across a range of different multi-task offline RL scenarios, including robotic manipulation from visual inputs and ant-maze navigation.

Author Information

Tianhe Yu (Stanford University)
Aviral Kumar (UC Berkeley)
Yevgen Chebotar (University of Southern California)
Chelsea Finn (Stanford)
Sergey Levine (UC Berkeley)
Karol Hausman (Google Brain)

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