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Poster
Improving Calibration through the Relationship with Adversarial Robustness
Yao Qin · Xuezhi Wang · Alex Beutel · Ed Chi

Tue Dec 07 08:30 AM -- 10:00 AM (PST) @ Virtual

Neural networks lack adversarial robustness, i.e., they are vulnerable to adversarial examples that through small perturbations to inputs cause incorrect predictions. Further, trust is undermined when models give miscalibrated predictions, i.e., the predicted probability is not a good indicator of how much we should trust our model. In this paper, we study the connection between adversarial robustness and calibration and find that the inputs for which the model is sensitive to small perturbations (are easily attacked) are more likely to have poorly calibrated predictions. Based on this insight, we examine if calibration can be improved by addressing those adversarially unrobust inputs. To this end, we propose Adversarial Robustness based Adaptive Label Smoothing (AR-AdaLS) that integrates the correlations of adversarial robustness and calibration into training by adaptively softening labels for an example based on how easily it can be attacked by an adversary. We find that our method, taking the adversarial robustness of the in-distribution data into consideration, leads to better calibration over the model even under distributional shifts. In addition, AR-AdaLS can also be applied to an ensemble model to further improve model calibration.

Author Information

Yao Qin (Google Research)
Xuezhi Wang (Google)
Alex Beutel (Google Research)
Ed Chi (Google Inc.)

d H. Chi is a Principal Scientist at Google, leading several machine learning research teams focusing on neural modeling, inclusive ML, reinforcement learning, and recommendation systems in Google Brain team. He has delivered significant improvements for YouTube, News, Ads, Google Play Store at Google with >325 product launches in the last 6 years. With 39 patents and over 120 research articles, he is also known for research on user behavior in web and social media. Prior to Google, he was the Area Manager and a Principal Scientist at Palo Alto Research Center's Augmented Social Cognition Group, where he led the team in understanding how social systems help groups of people to remember, think and reason. Ed completed his three degrees (B.S., M.S., and Ph.D.) in 6.5 years from University of Minnesota. Recognized as an ACM Distinguished Scientist and elected into the CHI Academy, he recently received a 20-year Test of Time award for research in information visualization. He has been featured and quoted in the press, including the Economist, Time Magazine, LA Times, and the Associated Press. An avid swimmer, photographer and snowboarder in his spare time, he also has a blackbelt in Taekwondo.

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